Author Topic: What do recyclers do with waste oil?  (Read 4797 times)

Russ

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What do recyclers do with waste oil?
« on: October 30, 2011, 11:12:08 am »
Does anyone know what happens to oil that gets recycled at the public dump spots or the stuff that in & out oil change stations recycle?

I have never seen a bottle of new oil that says "made from 25% recycled oil".  I wonder if it gets turned into other tyeps of lubricants, or does it get burned somewhere?

Backwoods

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Re: What do recyclers do with waste oil?
« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2011, 03:26:54 pm »
Does anyone know what happens to oil that gets recycled at the public dump spots or the stuff that in & out oil change stations recycle?

I have never seen a bottle of new oil that says "made from 25% recycled oil".  I wonder if it gets turned into other tyeps of lubricants, or does it get burned somewhere?

From what I have heard Russ is that the large recyclers sell the oil to large ocean going vessels that burn the oil in huge diesel engines,

And Vavoline makes a "Next Gen" oil made from 50 % recycled oil, just showed up @ the Napa bout 3 months ago

http://nextgen.valvoline.com/

I purchased a quart to inspect it, What you may expect to find is a darker type oil, but no this stuff is clear, very clear almost has less of a brownish oil look then new oil ??

« Last Edit: October 30, 2011, 03:39:52 pm by Backwoods »

gspringer@energylogic.com

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Re: What do recyclers do with waste oil?
« Reply #2 on: November 02, 2011, 01:45:07 pm »
Don't forget about waste oil heating systems. These waste oil heaters and boilers are a great way for garages, lube shops, car dealerships and heavy equipment dealers to recycle onsite. Any other method of disposal requires transportation and processing with mean unnecessary risk to these businesses producing the used oil onsite, exposing them to what could be very high costs if that used oil is spilled or otherwise improperly disposed of in transit. Burning waste oil as fuel for heat, on the other hand, allows these businesses to turn this liability into an asset and is a simple, yet far-reaching, way to “go green.” And, recycling onsite is the cleanest, most efficient manner of disposal for our environment.

EnergyLogic manufactures waste oil heaters and boilers and we have some information about onsite recycling on our website: http://www.energylogic.com/about-used-oil

naplis

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Re: What do recyclers do with waste oil?
« Reply #3 on: January 03, 2012, 07:55:25 am »
Curious. Does anyone know about the economics of the recycling business? Meaning, how much does a recycler get for the cleaned up oil he sells to a refinery or factory? I hear the recyclers pay about $.10 per gallon to the shops which generate the waste oil, but don't have any estimates of what they can sell it for.

Thanks,

Neil


Cmdr. Ron

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Re: What do recyclers do with waste oil?
« Reply #4 on: September 15, 2012, 05:36:14 pm »
SHALOM!
Sorry, Neil, no idea how much they make of it, yet.  That's one I've wondered, too.  What ever it is, it be purely profit.
There have been recycled lube oils on the market for a few years, but they always keep a very low profile about it, because of the sadly low understanding of the consumers.
    Oil does not wear-out; additives do, but not the oil.  That is correct, sir.  Navy ships carry tens of thousands of gallons of lube oil for the many engines and equipment.  On our ship, both engine rooms continuously filtered it, stopping only long enough to clean the huge mechanical filters once during each 8-hour watch.
    We never had more than a few specs of contaminates in the filters due to the severity with which we knew was required to keep a war ship battle-ready.  Because of that training & understanding, I built and use an auxiliary 10-micron filter on my pick-up to eliminate the soot inherent to diesels
    Clean oil is nearly clear like water - much lighter than amber, a color so faint that it's difficult to see.  Additives and contamination are what ya see on the dip stick.
Back to you in the booth.
Shalom!
Cmdr. Ron